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2022 virtual event schedule 

Explore our scheduled 2022 conference programming taking place virtually

Program information is subject to change, and is being updated daily.

View the live programming in Denver, CO schedule 

Friday, August 5th, 2022

7:00 p.m.–8:30 p.m. 

Keynote Conversation 

K-Ming Chang & Nate Marshall in conversation with Nicole Counts  (livestream)

 

Location: McNichols Building, Level 3

 

Saturday, August 6th, 2022

9:00 a.m.–10:05 a.m.

Community Track

Panel & Reading: Writing across waters / between worlds, *panelist information coming soon

Hosted in partnership with the Jaipur Literary Festival

Business/Industry Track

Panel: Movement Building & New Publishing Spaces, *panelist information coming soon

On building the spaces and communities we need, this panel will feature a discussion from leaders in literary movement building and creating, maintaining new publishing and writing spaces.

9:00 a.m.–10:05 a.m.

9:00 a.m.–10:05 a.m.

Writing Craft Track

More information coming soon

10:15 a.m.–11:20 a.m.

Community Track

Panel: Equity and Access in Translation, Navigating Translation with a Marginalized Identity, Moderated by paparouna, Panelists Sawad Hussein and Yilin Wang

Business/Industry Track

Workshop: YAY! I’m (Going to Be) Published. Now What?, Hosted by: Janae Marks & Valerie Bolling

This workshop will demystify the publishing process for aspiring and debut authors. We will discuss the process of what happens after a book is acquired, when to reach out to your agent vs. your editor, the difference between marketing and publicity, and how authors can help promote their books. There will also be time for audience questions.

10:15 a.m.–11:20 a.m.

Writing Craft Track

Workshop: How to Write Circles Around Others: Non-Linear Story Structures from Non-Western Traditions, Hosted by: Henry Lien

“Begin at the beginning," the King said, very gravely, "and go on till you come to the end: then stop.” ― Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland. Carroll’s king was clearly not a Chinese king. Western storytelling traditions decree that a linear structure (along with the three act structure, the hero’s journey, and a rising self-esteem arc) are mandatory features of any satisfying story. This is Western-centric silliness. This course explores non-linear structures, specifically cyclic and nested structures, using examples from non-Western stories and films. It explores how these non-linear structures allow for thematic stacking, embracing of moral complexity, and a synthesis between form and content to explode the idea that a straight line is the best way to tell every story. The course emphasizes practical craft takeaways for storytellers to apply to their own works in progress.

10:15 a.m.–11:20 a.m.

Lunch break

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

1:00 p.m.–2:05 p.m.

Community Track

Torch Literary Arts Showcase, with readings from featured poets Amanda Johnston, Dr. Sequoia Maner, Saida Agostini, Kindall Gant

Hosted in partnership with Torch Literary

1:00 p.m.–2:05 p.m.

Business/Industry Track

Panel: On Publishing & Publicity, Panelists: Jessica Chun, Ivan Lett, Cheryl Lew, and Lena Little

Hosted in partnership with Hachette Book Group

Writing Craft Track 

Panel: Neurodivergence, Madness, and Form, Moderated by: Cortland Nesley, panelist information coming soon

 

Content from lived experience narratives can potentially combat the ableism from clinical perspectives; however, their ability to do so is often limited by normative forms that presuppose a neurotypical/sane/colonial logic. What is "good" plotting? What is "good" pacing? What is "causality"? What is "logic"? Clinical pathologizations police the authenticity of Neurodivergent and Mad experiences when they do not match rigid and narrow homogeneous narrative frameworks. When Neurodivergent/Mad folk threaten neurotypical notions of normality in their stories, they are labeled crazy and are quickly brushed aside (and often incarcerated in psychiatric institutions). To wield Neurodivergent/Mad authenticity, the question of how to tell the story is just as important as what the story is. In what ways can we actively and intentionally madden and neuroqueer our storytelling? And, how can doing so be freeing?

1:00 p.m.–2:05 p.m.

Community Track

Panel & Reading: On supporting the work of writers who are incarcerated, Caits Meissner with Vivian Nixon Sterling Cunio Mitch Jackson Randall Horton Zeke Caligiuri

Hosted in partnership with PEN America

2:15 p.m.–3:20 p.m.

2:15 p.m.–3:20 p.m.

Business/Industry Track 

Workshop: Stranded in Submission Limbo: A Different Type of Torment, Hosted by: Mohamed Shalabi

 

Finding an agent is surely the end of the journey, right? You’ve got an agent, you’re on submission, and now what? I will discuss feelings of both excitement and angst, and answer these vital questions. As an agented author on submission, what are the best ways to handle the uncertainty of publishing? And what are best practices to combat imposter syndrome and stay focused on your individual journey before, during and after submission?

Writing Craft Track

Panel: Queer Asian Re-tellings, More information coming soon

2:15 p.m.–3:20 p.m.

3:30 p.m.–4:40 p.m.

Community Track

Panel: Reserving a Seat at the Table We’ve Made, Panelists: Amanda Johnston, Dr. Sequoia Maner, Saida Agostini, Kindall Gant

Hosted in partnership with Torch Literary Arts

Torch Literary Arts (TORCH) was founded in 2006 by Amanda Johnston to provide a space to publish and promote Black women writers. For over 15 years, TORCH has featured established and emerging writers online at TorchLiteryArts.org. This roundtable discussion brings together TORCH’s founder, features, and board members to discuss the needs, challenges, and joy of sustaining a space dedicated to Black women writers.

3:30 p.m.–4:40 p.m.

Business/Industry Track

Workshop: Self-Publishing 101, Hosted by Erica Ridley

3:30 p.m.–4:40 p.m.

Writing Craft Track

Panel: Authors Across the Americas, More information coming soon

Hosted in partnership with the Biennal of the Americas

4:45 p.m.–6:15p.m.

Dinner break

Awards Ceremony (livestream)

6:30 p.m.–8:00 p.m.

 

Sunday, August 7th, 2022

9:00 a.m.–10:05 a.m.

Community Track

Panel: Cities Come Alive: authentic lenses for diverse children who play, sing, and fly!, Moderated by Valerie Bolling, Panelists Brittany J. Thurman and Cynthia Harmony.

 

Cities provide an environment for children to have fun, achieve milestones, and connect with others in their family and community. Engage in a discussion with three picture book authors about creating agency in their characters that encourages children to play, learn, and take action. These authors will share excerpts from their books to show the importance of depicting nuances of our communities truthfully through text and illustration. In addition, this panel will discuss the importance of basing stories on personal experiences and why ALL diverse books belong in the hands of readers.

9:00 a.m.–10:05 a.m.

Business/Industry Track  

Panel: Query 101, Panelists: Linda Camacho, Priya Doraswamy, Ali Lake, and Sandy Lu

Literary Agents will discuss on your observations of the dos and don'ts of querying - some of the things that you love to see, tips for writers on successful pitches, pitfalls to avoid? This would be a one hour conversation with a moderator & audience Q&A.

Writing Craft Track

 More information coming soon

9:00 a.m.–10:05 a.m.

10:15 a.m.–11:20 a.m.

Community Track

Panel: Identity and Self-Love In the Time of Book Bans, Panelists: Jyoti Rajan Gopal, Nicole Chen, Valerie Bolling, Monique James Duncan, Jonathan Hillman

 

The backlash against books that decenter the hetero-normative white point of view is very real. Unfortunately, this is not new. Book bans have been around for centuries. What does feel new is that even books that merely seek to affirm a particular identity are now being targeted. Anything that mentions gender, race, culture, or sexuality seems to be up for grabs. And legislated against. That feels new and very, very dangerous.

10:15 a.m.–11:20 a.m.

Business/Industry Track 

Panel: What You Need to Know About Working with Agents, Moderated by: Aida Lilly, Panelists: Ali Lake, Sandy Lu, Kiana Nguyen

10:15 a.m.–11:20 a.m.

Writing Craft Track

More information coming soon

11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m.

Lunch break

1:00 p.m.–2:05 p.m.

Community Track 

Panel: The Beauty and Crisis of Writing Climate, panelist information coming soon

1:00 p.m.–2:05 p.m.

Business/Industry Track

Panel - Paths to Publication: Poetry, Panelists: Cynthia Manick, Tara Betts

What happens in addition to publication like community building. Who is going to buy your stuff if they don't know you or your work? How do you build a cohort - whether it's in a workshop, residency, or at an open mic?

1:00 p.m.–2:05 p.m.

Writing Craft Track

Panel: Writing Rom-Coms: Tropes, Timing, and the Perfect Kiss., Panelists: Maya Prasad, Brian D. Kennedy, and Priyanka Taslim

Slow-burn. Enemies-to-lovers. Fake dating. Tropes are a staple of rom-coms, but it takes skill and practice to pull them off in an original way. In this panel, three debut authors will discuss the craft of writing rom-coms, including comedic situations and timing, building to the perfect kiss, and keeping your readers in suspense about how that “Happily Ever After” will unfold.

2:15 p.m.–3:20 p.m.

Community Track

KidLit in Color: Writing and Modeling Anti-Racism for Young Readers, Panelists: Kaitlyn Wells, Valerie Bolling, Kirstie Myvett, and Tina Athaide

 

Picture books, chapter books, YA novels -- these genres all get lumped into the category of “kidlit,” and they are often separated from the more lauded category of “literature.” However, one of the most important ways that anti-racism work can be accomplished is through literature for young readers. In this session, children’s writers will read short excerpts from our work and discuss how a dedication to diversity and anti-racism influences our writing. We will also discuss how reaching young readers through books is critical in two ways: children of color and children from marginalized communities need these books as “mirrors” for their own self-development, while white children need these books as windows into marginalized communities. Finally, we will discuss the legacy of the #ownvoices movement, which strived to highlight books in which the protagonist and author belong to the same community.

2:15 p.m.–3:20 p.m.

Business/Industry Track 

Panel - Paths to Publication: Fiction, panelist information coming soon

2:15 p.m.–3:20 p.m.

Writing Craft Track

Panel: Nonfiction & the Storyteller, panelist information coming soon

3:30 p.m.–4:00 p.m.

Closing Ceremony (livestream)